strigisarcana:

 - Dark side of the lens

(Source: pleoros, via running-barefoot-thru-the-forest)

"And it has been
one hell
of a year.
I have worn
the seasons
under my sleeves,
on my thighs,
running down my cheeks.
This is what
surviving
looks like, my dear."

Michelle K., It Has Been One Hell of a Year (via aestheticintrovert)

(via writing-reverie)

lemon-pledge-laverne:

Jousting with a willow, a bull elk wins a garland for his trouble
National Geographic
June.1973

lemon-pledge-laverne:

Jousting with a willow, a bull elk wins a garland for his trouble

National Geographic

June.1973

(via oraclesofthefortuneteller)

"And I add my own love to the history of people who have loved beautiful things, and looked out for them, and pulled them from the fire, and sought them when they were lost, and tried to preserve them and save them while passing them along literally from hand to hand, singing out brilliantly from the wreck of time to the next generation of lovers, and the next."

Donna Tartt, from The Goldfinch (via the-final-sentence)

oraclesofthefortuneteller:


//

oraclesofthefortuneteller:

(Source: outrageauxbonnesmoeurs)

oraclesofthefortuneteller:

terramantra:

Anne Brigman


//

oraclesofthefortuneteller:

terramantra:

Anne Brigman

"

I wish I could say
The rain erases
Numbers and
Rinses names
Away.

But
It would not
Be true. A stand
Of oak speaks
With ten thousand
Green tongues
Scattering words
Like a blur
Of blackbirds.

"

Conrad Hilberry, from “A Thin Song for a Girl,” in Sorting the Smoke (University of Iowa Press, 1990)

(Source: apoetreflects)

"We must not look at goblin men,
We must not buy their fruits:
Who knows upon what soil they fed
Their hungry thirsty roots?"

From Goblin Market, by Christina Rossetti

Lilith, by Kenyon Cox, 1856 - 1919

Lilith, by Kenyon Cox, 1856 - 1919

"Do you not remember Jeanie,
How she met them in the moonlight,
Took their gifts both choice and many,
Ate their fruits and wore their flowers
Pluck’d from bowers
Where summer ripens at all hours?
But ever in the noonlight
She pined and pined away;
Sought them by night and day,
Found them no more, but dwindled and grew grey;
Then fell with the first snow,
While to this day no grass will grow
Where she lies low:
I planted daisies there a year ago
That never blow.
You should not loiter so."

From Goblin Market, by Christina Rossetti

The Death of Albine, by John Collier

The Death of Albine, by John Collier

"And a softness came from the starlight and filled me full to the bone."

W. B. Yeats, from “The Wanderings of Oisin,” in The Wanderings of Oisin and Other Poems (Kegan Paul and Co., 1889)

(via apoetreflects)

The Priestess of Delphi, by John Collier, 1891

The Priestess of Delphi, by John Collier, 1891

"An elderly dame, too, dwells in my neighbourhood, invisible to most persons, in whose odorous herb garden I love to stroll sometimes, gathering simples and listening to her fables; for she has a genius of unequalled fertility, and her memory runs back farther than mythology, and she can tell me the origin of every fable and on what fact every one is founded, for the incidents occurred when she was young. A ruddy and lusty old dame, who delights in all weathers and seasons, and is likely to outlive all her children yet."

Thoreau, from ‘Solitude’ in Walden 

from autumn to winter by nikolinelr on Flickr.

from autumn to winter by nikolinelr on Flickr.